Acoustic Divider, Constructed


One of the last pieces for the office we designed in Paris was installed last week – an undulating partial-height acoustic divider that breaks up one breakout space into 3 smaller, quieter meeting spaces. The office, designed in Collaboration with Atelier 208, was completed over the summer, with a few pieces remaining to be installed.

The photos, by Atelier 208, follow the install of six prefabricated unique pieces, crafted by Rennes-based millworker AMC, and assembled on site over the course of four hours.

The wall adds additional functionality to an already rich space, while limiting distractions to teams located in its proximity. Informal meetings, briefings, and calls can occur in tandem to other work on the floor, while adding a visual focal point at the southern end of the space.

acoustic divider

MP Pool Party, Year 3

Just launched: the video documenting the 3rd year of summer installations dubbed MP Pool Party around a pool on Roosevelt Island. Located as part of the Manhattan Park residential community, the pool has become a key piece of the K&Co and Pliskin Architecture ongoing renovations to the 880-unit rental complex. The 2017 installation features an 8,000sf mural by Gregg V. Emery titled Waves off Roosevelt Island. The video was created by Patrick Mandeville of Divided Line Productions, and captures the transition from last year’s minimalist mural by Andrew Faris to Gregg’s layered interpretation of the over sized canvas, and through to the community’s embrace of the pool, the painting and the furnishing curated by K&Co’s Aaron Levy. The video features the music of Secret Creatures, drone footage by Amy Shell, and additional video footage by Andrea Fuma.

This year’s installation, labeled one of New York City’s most instagrammable summer locations, has been featured in TimeOut New Yorkthe New York PostDNAuntappedcitiescurbed, and PureWow.

Paris Custom

custom furniture
For the recently completed office space for the Parisian team of an international data security company, we embarked on the design and fabrication of a series of custom furniture pieces. The office, situated in La Defense, was designed by Pliskin Architecture and Atelier 208, and the furniture was fabricated by AMC at their facility in Brittany.

custom furniture
The first custom furniture piece visitors encounter is the office’s reception desk, a combination of steel structure and end-grain wood surface, with the company’s logo carved out of the vertical steel spine. Set against an exposed brick wall, salvaged theater seating, and metal drum stools, the oak desk and bright orange supports create a visual focal point for people as they exist the elevators on the floor.

custom furniture
We also created a series of work benches unique to the space. With felt covered acoustic partitions that double as tack boards, the light oak tops and concealed cable management solutions create design that is both striking and functional.

custom furniture
Centrally located in the office, the pantry acts as a activity hub for the office, and to support that, we crafted two large communal gathering opportunities: a 3-tiered stepped seating area, and communal table that allows both table-height and bar-height seating, encouraging employees to use it in various ways.

Architects & Climate Accountability

I spent a few days considering the recent withdrawal of the US Federal Government from the landmark Paris Climate Agreement – a decision that seems short sighted, narrow minded, and potentially catastrophic. However, among the immediate negative connotations, I found great relief in what has promptly followed – the outpouring of responses from world leaders, local government, businesses, and professionals in the building industries, committing to climate accountability at their respective areas of work and jurisdiction. This level of response, resistance, and awareness that the decision has generated has culminated in a resounding call to action, which in the absence of a National commitment, is the next best thing we can hope for.

First and foremost, we are loudly and collectively talking about what Climate Change is, how it will affect us, and what we all can do about – all of which would have largely stayed off the radar of the greater public had the US stayed in this accord: We are now talking about diet (finally), and waste, and personal transport; Cities, tech companies, and even energy companies, are publicly declaring emission reduction goals; Private funds are being leveraged where public money may soon dry out. While it is hard for me to be happy about this very bad decision, I do feel we are nearing a critical mass of understanding and support that will soften the blow of a government guided by short-term special interests, over a long-term cause of far reaching consequences.

So what should we do next? Simply put, we should all do our part until the Federal Government reengages with this topic, which can many forms:

On a personal level, there is a lot we can do, many of the tweaks to our daily routines being highlighted in the media in recent weeks, such as the NY Times, Curbed, and the UN.

As architects, we must first renew our own commitments to the environment, commit to leading on climate change, and continue engaging our clients in how to minimize the footprint of our projects, while using our projects as educational tools that will help highlight the challenges at hand and the solutions already in play; we then should consider the various avenues for political and community action, such as signing the Architects Advocate Letter to Congress, joining the AIA opposition to the withdrawal, or supporting the US Green Building Council.

On a local level, we can (and should) petition our elected officials to engage with the topic, renew commitments for emission reductions, alternative energy, and sustainable development wherever possible. This has already begun, at the local level, as well as a growing national movement – all of which we should support and encourage.

Last, we keep educating ourselves and those around us. The data is out there, the solutions have been discussed and vetted across the globe, and consequences of ignoring this issue have already started manifesting – we can no longer hide behind what we didn’t know, we must take action based on the concrete knowledge we’ve been able to amass over the last 30 years.

 

MP Pool Party, Year 3 Preview

The 3rd annual summer pop up at the Manhattan Park Pool Club on Roosevelt Island will launch next weekend, and preparations are underway:

This year, K&Co and Pliskin Architecture commissioned Gregg V Emery, pictured above, to create the 8,000sf mural that anchors the installation and that will act as a backdrop for the summer pool season. We’ve collected a few of the social media mentions of the mural here, creating a year 3 preview of sorts.

Earlier this week, the K&Co and pa|nyc teams joined Gregg on site on a sunny afternoon to help paint, detail, and squeegee the concrete pool deck, which was captured in the above time lapse.

year 3 preview

Gregg, above with Krista Ninivaggi of K&Co, follows in the footsteps of HOT TEA and Andrew Faris, who created the 1st and 2nd murals, respectively, in the MP Pool Party series.

A Growing Parisian Album

20th Century Classics: checking out The Pyramid at the @museelouvre by #impei

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With construction underway on our first project in Paris, a pleasant side effect is a growing Parisian Album, assembled of urban moments and snapshots that have been captured throughout our social media feeds.

Little house on the train tracks

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With construction of the office designed by our NY team with the help of the Parisian crew of Atelier 208 nearing its end, I took a moment and looked through some of the photos that have accumulated on Pliskin Architecture’s Instagram page.

Passing through Canopée des Halles by #bergeranziutti

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These photos formed a sort of retroactive Parisian Album – moments captured on the streets (and train tracks, and airports) of Paris once onsite meetings wrapped up.

Red boarding ramps at #paulandreu's Terminal 2E at #CDGAirport

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Cobblestone alley in #bastille

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Evening shadows descend on #montparnasse

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A New Home for K&Co and pa|nyc

K&Co and pa|nyc
Construction has started on a new office space for the K&Co and Pliskin Architecture teams, in anticipation for the upcoming move of both firms to the Financial District in Lower Manhattan. After several years of growth at the Hudson River Collaborative in Tribeca, we are all ready to excited on the next chapter.

K&Co and pa|nyc
The new office, scheduled for completion next month, was designed as a collective effort by K&Co and pa|nyc, and led by Krista Ninivaggi, K&Co’s founder, design muse, and longtime personal friend of mine (above, checking out the future location for the pantry of the new office space).

K&Co and pa|nyc
View of the future conference room….

K&Co and pa|nyc
…which will face west, with front row seats to the evolving skyline in the Financial District and Battery Park City, with new and old offices and residence constantly get layered on top of each other.

Paris Construction Commences

Paris Construction
Work has begun on our new office project in Paris, and quite honestly, we’re excited. The space was designed in collaboration with Atelier 208 in Paris, and once complete, will be the home for the local team of an international technology company. This is will be Pliskin Architecture’s first built project outside of the US, and the Paris construction team is scheduled to complete the space by the end of May 2017.

Paris Construction
Demolition has begun in the space, and old infrastructure is being pulled out of hte access floors across the space to make room for new technology that will cover the space.

Paris Construction
The future site of the reception area is being cleared to make room for a translucent wall that will both feature the latest news regarding the company and its clients, as well as hint at the work being conducted immediately behind it.

insert conference room here

Photos: Atelier 208

Construction Update, Bed-Stuy

Bed-Stuy Update
We stopped by our construction site in Bed-Stuy to check in on the gut renovation of a Brooklyn Townhouse, and observed the fruits of several months of accelerated work on site. The work on this turn-of-the-century home has set out to restore it to its glory days, while creating a contemporary residence for a young family, with all the modern-day comforts.

Bed-Stuy Update
A significant amount of the original woodwork has survived the many iterations of this Bedford-Stuyvesant home, while new herringbone oak flooring was introduced in the parlour floor to replace the a worn-out predecessor and create a unique feel for the new residents.

Bed-Stuy Update
The existing trims and casings were then stripped of several layers of paint, and a new clean coat was added to accentuate the delicate detailing created by the original crafts person, and that is quintessential to Bed-Stuy town homes of that era.

Bed-Stuy Update
The bathrooms were all upgraded to meet modern day standards and aesthetics, with special care taken to add unique and durable layer to assure another generation of use in the house. Above, handcrafted cement tiles are ebing sealed in advance of installation…

Bed-Stuy Update
…then installed in the children’s bathroom, serving as the monochrome base for the colorful subway tiles that surround the bathtub.

Bed-Stuy Update
Existing floors were preserved and refinished in all the bedrooms, window trims refurbished and refinished, while base trims were replaced with trims custom made for this renovation.

Bed-Stuy Update
Last, a steel stair was added to connect the parlour level and the private garden, with a platform atop to create an exterior extension to the new kitchen that will serve as a serving station during fair-weather outings.

Pliskin Architecture Team: James Quick, Amy Shell, Thomas Heltzel, Barak Pliskin

General Contractor: Amr Sinada / HiTech Construction & Aluminum Systems Inc

Juno Photoshoot

Juno Photoshoot
Juno, a ride-sharing startup based in NYC, has recently moved into 1 World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan. Their new space, designed by Pitsou Kedem, Sigal Baranowitz, and Pliskin Architecture, occupies a north-facing suite on one of the highest floor in the new downtown super-tall tower.

Juno Photoshoot
The design team, together with photographer David Rahr, was back in the space to document it. We were in luck – we ended up shooting on a crisp day with excellent visibility, affording us the ability to capture the space and one of its most striking features: uninterpreted views to the east, north, west.


The space was designed with the views in mind – limited obstructions, minimalist palette, and open offices and lounges occupying the areas adjacent to the floor-to-ceiling glass walls that surround the suite.

Juno Photoshoot
To document the space, David and pa|nyc team followed the sun and shadows across the space, from early morning through sunset and dusk, trying to capture the nuances of a full work day at the Juno space.

Sunset at yesterday's photoshoot / Juno's offices by @pitsou_kedem_architect, @sigalb74, and #pa_nyc

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Above photos were captured by the design team – stay tuned for the finished photos by David, due to land Mid-February.
Juno Photoshoot

Finishing Touches in Midtown


Work on the Pliskin Architecture designed apartment combination in Midtown, Manhattan has completed, with finishing touches going in during the last few weeks of 2016. Above is time lapse footage of the last 3 weeks of the year and of the apartment renovation, with lighting, millwork, audio/video equipment, and furniture coming together in the living room to complete the work.